Saturday, June 19, 2010

Vetro 990: Honey Crunch


Vetro 990 Honeycrunch is a transparent amber with a white core.

I suppose you could slice it up for murrini if you wished.

I was hoping for extreme drama streakiness - maybe like a streaky ivory - but it actually looks pretty much exactly like what you'd expect from topaz over white. Although it does look more like topaz and ivory. It doesn't really show as white.































When making the beads - it certainly looked extremely streaky - huge contrasting streaks - but the beads that came out of the kiln seem less dramatic.

But still very nice.


I've seen some issues with some of these streaky odd lots and encasing - so I encased this spacer and it seems fine.

And finally, with Hades on top - super heated. Just because. ;-)


Pretty nice colour - bet I could make great horses with this.

6 comments:

  1. Did you have a problem with shockiness in the rods? This is one of the few colors I won't use for this reason. Or is there a trick other than preheating?

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  2. I didn't have a problem with shockyness with these. I know what you mean though - some of these Vetro cored cane streaky colours are completely unworkable.

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  3. Love your blog, Dwyn! I have had some interesting effects with these cored canes when I put larger dollop/dots on - the centre colour comes through more.

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  4. OMG, Carol I have tons of problems with HC and shockiness. I actually pulled this out again today (after not using it in a long time). I stuck the rod in the kiln and it melting great, right up to the point where it was sticking out of the kiln, so, preheat and it should be OK.

    Dragonjools, I like to use silvered glass on HC, especially shards. Yummy

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  5. hmmm - guess I got lucky! Maybe I didn't actually let it cool down - I did make all the beads in quick succession.

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  6. Anonymous1:30 PM

    I love this colour, and will try it, even though it is reported to be shocky... ugh. One thing I tried with cold glass, last winter, was warming it first in hot tap water (& drying it of course). That helps a bit with shocking, if you don't have a rack, and have the time and patience. Gail Bryant - have to figure out the profile now.

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